Subject Vision

The aim of the computing department is to enable all pupils to be confident digital citizens, who have the opportunity to embrace technology and develop transferrable skills. To help prepare students for jobs in the Computer Science industry and achieve their full potential. 

Curriculum Plan

All Key Stage 3 pupils have one lesson of computing every 2 weeks, all key stage 4 pupils that opt for GCSE Computer Science have 5 lessons every 2 weeks. KS4 pupils that do not opt to take the subject at GCSE will be taught Computing skills across the curriculum. 

Key Stage 3 Curriculum Map

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E-Safety & Ethics

Flowol

How a Computer Works

End of Yr 7 Test

Data Representation

HTML

Database Development

End of Yr 8 Test

Computer crime and security

Python

Image Manipulation Firerworks

End of Yr 9 Test

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

 

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Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (sorting, searching etc.); use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational products; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions

 

 

 

 

 

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Understand simple Boolean logic and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers

 

 

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Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and other systems

 

 

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Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer systems

 

 

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Understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally

 

 

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Undertake creative projects* that involve selecting, using and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users

 

 

 

 

 

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Create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digitally artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability.

 

 

 

 

 

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Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and how to report concerns.

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GCSE Computer Science Curriculum Map

Year Group

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

10

Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and how to report concerns. 

 

Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and other systems 

 

Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer systems 

 

Understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally 

 

Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and how to report concerns.

 

Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and other systems

 

Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer systems

 

 

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

 

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (sorting, searching etc.); use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem

 

Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational products; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions

 

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

 

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (sorting, searching etc.); use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem

 

Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational products; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions

 

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

 

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (sorting, searching etc.); use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem

 

Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational products; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions

 

Understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally

 

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

 

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (sorting, searching etc.); use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem

 

Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational products; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions

 

11

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

 

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (sorting, searching etc.); use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem

 

Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational products; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions

 

Undertake creative projects* that involve selecting, using and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users

 

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

 

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (sorting, searching etc.); use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem

 

Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational products; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions

 

Undertake creative projects* that involve selecting, using and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users

 

 

Revision of all key priority content covered in year 10 and year 11

N/A

 

Assessment

Key Stage 3

All pupils in key stage 3 are assessed at the end of each unit of work. These results are then used to calculate an average computing level for each term, which are also used to calculate the end of year level awarded to each pupil. 

Key Stage 4 – GSCE Computer Science

Year 10 and 11 Internal Assessments

Assessments are carried out at the end of every topic of study in years 10 and 11. In year 10, these results combined with regular exam questions practice and termly assessments provide the basis for the year 10 report grades. 
In year 11 we also carry out end of term topic tests, exam practice questions and mock exams in both November and February. These results inform report grades and forecast grades for the end of year 11. 


Year 11 External GCSE Assessment

Component 01: Computer systems
The computer systems and programming unit will teach you the theory about a wide range of issues such as hardware and software, the representation of data in computer systems, databases, computer communications and networking, programming and more. 
You will learn how computers work and how they communicate with each other. You will learn about how processors work and its relationship to memory and speed. You will explore how all computer processing is based on binary logic and how different components like sound and video can be stored in a computer. You will begin to understand some of the workings behind the Internet including how an e-¬‐mail gets from one place to another. 
You will also be learning some of the key techniques behind programming: how to express ideas in sequences of steps, how to approach solving problems and what the main tricks are to get your software code doing what you want. This unit will be assessed through a written exam and is worth 50% of the GCSE. 
 
Component 02: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming
Students apply knowledge and understanding gained in component 01. They develop skills and understanding in computational thinking: algorithms, programming techniques, producing robust programs, computational logic and translators. This unit will be assessed through a written exam and is worth 50% of the GCSE
 

Component

Component Title

How Assessed

Percentage of Final Grade

1

Computer Systems

External Written Paper

50

2

Computational thinking, algorithms and programming

External Written Paper

50

 

Outcomes

GCSE Computer Science is a popular GCSE option subject which attracts a wide variety of pupils. Pupils regularly produce high quality programming modules for their non-examined assessment.  Unfortunately this is a new course for HHGS and therefore there are no historical outcomes to share

What Next

Pathways and careers within a computing aspect:

Courses:

  • A-Level Computer Science 
  • Vocational Computer Science courses
  • Computer Science Degree 
  • Practical Programming Courses

Careers:

  • Application analyst.
  • Applications developer.
  • Cyber security analyst.
  • Data analyst.
  • Database administrator.
  • Forensic computer analyst.
  • Game designer.
  • Games developer
  • Information systems manager
  • IT consultant
  • Software engineer
  • Systems analyst
  • Web designer
  • Web developer